Knowledge Management

Knowledge Management

We help organizations make the most of their internal knowledge and expertise

In today's increasingly complex digital environment, it is critical for organizations to make the most of their internal knowledge in order to achieve operational excellence, offer the best possible services, spark innovation, and meet stakeholders' needs. 

Consistent, systematic knowledge management practices can help organizations achieve these goals. 

Why Knowledge Management? 



Knowledge Management: connecting people to the information & and knowledge
they need to be successful

Supporting the full lifecycle of knowledge


Knowledge Management (KM) strives to make knowledge useful, usable, adaptable, and reusable. KM targets both tacit knowledge, i.e., knowledge in people's heads, and knowledge that has been captured and converted into a knowledge asset. 

Knowledge Management is about helping organizations best take advantage of staff's internal expertise, skills, and know-how. It includes helping organizations respond to the challenge, "we don't know what we know" -- a common issue as organizations become more complex and work becomes more distributed across locations and silos. 

It's about supporting the flow of knowledge across boundaries and silos to foster creativity, spark innovation, and enable the development of new knowledge. 

Get Started with Knowledge Management: 

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Knowledge Management Assessments

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Knowledge Curation Services

Latest Knowledge Management Resources:

Balancing Security and Sharing

For most organizations, it can be a challenge to balance the need to protect and secure data with the need to promote internal knowledge sharing. But it doesn't have to be the case.

Developing a Knowledge Management Program

Designing, launching, and establishing a new knowledge management program takes careful planning and execution. Too often, we see organizations fail. Avoid common mistakes.

Levels of Knowledge Management

A look at four levels of knowledge management (KM): personal or individual; department, project or team; organization-wide; and inter-organizational.

Open Knowledge vs Knowledge Management

In many ways, Open Knowledge is just a subset of Knowledge Management. While KM often focuses on internal knowledge sharing, it doesn't have to exclude externally-focused knowledge sharing, uptake, and re-use.

Ten Minute Knowledge Sharing

This 10-minute knowledge sharing exercise can be a simple, fast, and effective way to get started with knowledge management, without draining resources.

Ready to start a knowledge management initiative?